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How a previous marriage can affect a new one

| May 28, 2021 | Family Law |

It can take time to cope with divorce and move forward. However, most people eventually start new relationships. When one of these relationships gets serious, remarriage could be the next step.

If you are currently thinking about remarrying, your ex may be the last person on your mind. However, they and your previous marriage could wind up affecting your new union more than you might expect.

Familiarity with the divorce process

Having gone through the divorce process once, you understand what it entails. You know that in Ontario you will divide the value of the difference between the spouses’ increased net worth during the marriage and you will determine what will happen to your children, all of which can make for a stressful and expensive experience.

And if your split was contentious, you know that people who once loved each other can wind up saying and doing hurtful things.

Understanding that all this can happen could make it easier to appreciate the importance of legal tools like marriage contracts. These documents will not prevent a divorce, but they provide valuable guidance and protection that make the process easier, should it arise.

Termination of support

If you currently receive financial support from your ex, remarrying could trigger termination of spousal support. However, that is not always the case.

Depending on your original order, spousal support could continue after you remarry. Check your agreement to determine if there is an end date or situation, like remarriage or cohabitation, marking the end of the financial obligation. Otherwise, parties may need to petition the courts to terminate an order.

Living arrangements

Getting remarried could mean relocation and welcoming more children into your family. And new spouses may come with financial resources, property and relationships that affect your living arrangements.

Depending on your new circumstances, you may need to reassess matters like parenting time (access). Where you live, and the people with whom you live can have a dramatic impact on your children from previous relationships, and spending more or less time in your new living environment may be appropriate.

Taking these factors into consideration before remarriage can make it easier for you to start the new union feeling confident and ready for whatever comes next.

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Contact Gene C. Colman for a customized legal strategy today.

Contact Gene C. Colman for a customized legal strategy today.